Not many people sit and think about what they would do if a devastating tornado or fire completely demolished their home and left them “homeless.” When the unthinkable happens, Additional Living Expense, an often overlooked coverage that is typically part of a homeowners policy, may prove to be a financial and emotional lifesaver.

Homeowners insurance is an intangible asset that can be difficult to understand – until you really need it! Yet it provides peace of mind should a catastrophe occur. Most homeowners and renters insurance policies include Additional Living Expense (ALE) coverage, which is also known as “loss of use”. This coverage provides reimbursement for extra living expenses while your home is being repaired or rebuilt due to a covered loss.

The intent of ALE coverage is to help you maintain your current standard of living during the rebuilding process. Examples of this coverage would be: (this list is not all-inclusive)

  • Cost of a hotel or rental, including a rental deposit
  • Storage fees for your belongings
  • Furniture rental and kitchen supplies, if needed
  • Short-term food expenses (until you locate a place with a kitchen)
  • Laundry needs, if your home had a washer and dryer
  • Pet boarding costs
  • Additional mileage costs associated with employment, schools, church and home repairs
  • Moving costs between the rental and the damaged residence

A covered loss must occur for the ALE coverage to apply. This includes, but is not limited to damage caused by: wind, fire, lightning, vandalism, or an explosion. A standard homeowners insurance policy does not cover flood damage, so these living expenses would be out-of-pocket. Remember, ALE coverage is intended to help with additional living expenses, not all living expenses. The coverage pays for expenses that you would not have incurred if the disaster didn’t happen. It doesn’t cover your current mortgage, property taxes or entertainment expenses.

Another thing to be aware of is the policy limit for Additional Living Expense.  ALE coverage is usually based on the amount of insurance you carry on your home (Coverage A value). It may be capped at a percentage of your dwelling limit, most commonly 20 percent of Coverage A. For example, if your home is insured for $250,000, you could have up to $50,000 for additional living expenses.

We encourage you to discuss this coverage with your independent insurance agent. Ultimately, the time to discuss is before a loss occurs!

The coverages described here are in the most general terms, and are subject to the actual policy conditions and exclusions. For actual coverage wording, conditions, and exclusions, refer to the policy or contact your agent.

Share |


No Comments


Post a Comment
Name
Required
E-Mail
Required (Not Displayed)
Comment
Required


All comments are moderated and stripped of HTML.
Submission Validation
Required
CAPTCHA
Change the CAPTCHA codeSpeak the CAPTCHA code
 
Enter the Validation Code from above.
NOTICE: This blog and website are made available by the publisher for educational and informational purposes only. It is not be used as a substitute for competent insurance, legal, or tax advice from a licensed professional in your state. By using this blog site you understand that there is no broker client relationship between you and the blog and website publisher.
Blog Archive


View Mobile Version